politics and issues

fuckallies:

On average, you have a 1 in 18,989 chance of being murdered

A trans person has a 1 in 12 chance of being murdered

The average life span of a cis person is about 75-90 

The average life expectancy of a trans person is 23-30 years old

75% of people killed in anti LGBT hate crimes are poc

Think about this the next time you go crying over “cisphobia” and “reverse racism”

niki-van-awesome:

spring-loaded-jesus-candles:

fireghostshigher:

A quick PSA, because working in a New Age store I realize a lot of people don’t know this.  Keep in mind this is the simple version.

The fella on the left-hand side, that’s Gautama Buddha, the Buddha, the central figure in Buddhism.  Note that he is not considered a god, but a teacher and spiritual leader, the first to attain Enlightenment in his era.  Note also how thin he is.  This is because the Buddha fasted a lot.  He was born Siddhartha Gautama.  Buddha is a title, and not actually his name.

The fella on the right-hand side is not Buddha.  This is a common misconception in the West.  That is Hotai (or Budai or Hotei depending on the language), a Buddhist monk from China and folkloric hero.  Hotai is thought by many to be a Buddha, but he is not the Buddha.  Unlike Buddha, Hotai actually is revered as a god in Chinese folklore, although not in Buddhist practice.

This post is based on things I’ve been taught by my Buddhist coworker but if I forgot or mixed up something important and you are Buddhist and you notice, please let me know.

This has been an informational post.  Have a nice day.

FOR THE LOVE OF GOD EVERYONE READ THIS. READ IT. LEARN IT. PREACH IT.

I AM SO TIRED OF EVERYONE BELIEVING THIS MISCONCEPTION.

In 1979, when the minimum wage was $2.90, a hard-working student with a minimum-wage job could earn enough in one day (8.44 hours) to pay for one academic credit hour. If a standard course load for one semester consisted of maybe 12 credit hours, the semester’s tuition could be covered by just over two weeks of full-time minimum wage work—or a month of part-time work. A summer spent scooping ice cream or flipping burgers could pay for an MSU education. The cost of an MSU credit hour has multiplied since 1979. So has the federal minimum wage. But today, it takes 60 hours of minimum-wage work to pay off a single credit hour, which was priced at $428.75 for the fall semester.
No woman wants an abortion like she wants an ice cream cone or a Porsche. She wants an abortion like an animal caught in a trap wants to gnaw off its own leg.

Anonymous  (via sweetfilthpig)

Things men don’t understand #28464

(via izcon)

What your yearly taxes pay for (assuming a 50K salary):

teamsternation:

  • $3.98 for natural disaster relief through FEMA
  • $6.96 for welfare
  • $22.88 for unemployment
  • $36.82 for food stamps through SNAP
  • $43.78 for retirement/disability for government workers (civilian/military)
  • $235.81 for YOUR Medicare
  • $247.75 for defense
  • and $4,000.00 for corporate subsidies

Are you sure you are pissed off at the right people?

themochagoddess:

THANK YOU. I’m glad someone pointed it out.

themochagoddess:

THANK YOU. I’m glad someone pointed it out.

medievalpoc:

cameogal13:

medievalpoc:

kat-in-chicago:

medievalpoc:

heartsalchemy:

medievalpoc:

Peter Lely

Portrait of Elizabeth Murray

England (c. 1650)

Oil on canvas, 124 x 119 cm

[x] [x] [x] [x]

I think I have seen pictures of this before, in high school maybe, but I don’t remember there being a second person before. I seem to remember this image being cropped differently too, which is very disturbing because now that I see the entire painting, the way I remember it being cropped was very clearly and deliberately intended to remove the person holding the tray of flowers.

Since we’re throwing haymakers at the kyriarchy today, I think this is something that we should really be talking about too, because it happens

ALL. THE. TIME.

Level 1: People of Color from Medieval, Renaissance, and other Early Modern European works were often literally painted over in later decades or centuries.

For example: In this painting, Giulia de’Medici (the child) was painted over in the 19th century:

image

Level 2: It was very fashionable in a lot of 17th and 18th century paintings to have a Black servant featured in portraits of very important historical figures from European History.

Honestly? They’re practically ubiquitous. A lot of the very famous paintings you’ve seen of European and American historical figures have a Black servant in them that have been cropped out or painted over.

Those silly stock photos from your American History Professor’s Powerpoint?

Your Professor’s PowerPoint for “George Washington”:

image

image

The actual painting:

image

image

Your professor’s Powerpoint on Jean Chardin:

image

The actual painting:

image

PowerPoint on Maria Henriette Stuart (with some commentary about the Habsburg jaw):

image

Actual Painting:

image

But, because of whitewashed history curricula, teachers and professors continue to use the cropped images because they don’t want their lecture to get “derailed” by a discussion about race.

These images are also more commonly seen on stock photo sites, including ones for academic use.

I honestly can’t find anyone really writing about this, or even any analysis on how often the cropped photos are used.

The reason they are so easy to crop out is because of the the artistic conventions which reflect the power hierarchy:

Oil paintings of aristocratic families from this period make the point clearly. Artists routinely positioned black people on the edges or at the rear of their canvasses, from where they gaze wonderingly at their masters and mistresses. In order to reveal a ‘hierarchy of power relationships’, they were often placed next to dogs and other domestic animals, with whom they shared, according to the art critic and novelist David Dabydeen, ‘more or less the same status’. Their humanity effaced, they exist in these pictures as solitary mutes, aesthetic foils to their owners’ economic fortunes.

This is drastically oversimplified, but at least it addresses it directly.

If anyone knows more on any studies or statistical evidence on this tendency, feel free to add it.

Everyone needs to read this post.  I’ve seen some of these cropped images so often it never even occurred to me that this wasn’t the whole image - it definitely wouldn’t have occurred to me to do research beyond the Google Image result if (to use the example) I needed an image of Washington for a powerpoint. I’m an archaeology graduate student and TA and I do some work (and eventually, presumably some teaching) in US historical archaeology, so it’s probable that at some point I’ll be preparing a lecture that I’ll want to illustrate with an image of Washington or some other prominent figure.  Far from wanting to avoid an uncomfortable discussion about race, I would so much prefer to show the full image - my god, especially if I imagine teaching about the archaeology of Mount Vernon, showing these full images of Washington and the people around him would make that discussion so much more enriching.

But I’m an archaeologist, not an art historian, not very familiar with these paintings and not trained to look critically for signs of cropping or other modification, and my first stop for illustrating a talk is Google Images, not an art gallery. I’m not interested in avoiding discussions of race, rather I’m super invested in having those discussions - and I can’t do that as well if I don’t even suspect that there’s something missing from the images I’m using.

But now I’ll remember this, and be suspicious, and look a little further into the first usable picture I find when this comes up in my teaching, as it inevitably will.

medievalpoc, I think you run the most important blog on the internet right now, thank you for doing this.

I think if enough of us take an interdisciplinary approach, we have the chance to make a REALLY huge difference!!!!

image

Les faize d’Alexandre (a translation of Historiae Alexandri Magni of Quintus Curtius Rufus), Bruges, c. 1468-1475

In my opinion when my teacher ‘crop’ a photo, they’re actually not the ones cropping it. They gets the photos off the internet. And to be honest even though I’m in an A.P. Class, many students still get really focused and distracted on what’s in the background of the photos when we are supposed to be focused on the historical figure. So it’s often better to used the cropped photo as it keeps the focus. But it doesn’t mean that they’re not teaching about the artistic and cultural impacts of the African community on the Caucasian community. We do see the actual pictures; and we do learn the actual stories.

1. I felt like I allowed for that in the original post? A lot of educators themselves don’t know when they’re using a cropped photo. Databases for educators often will use historical images that have already had everything cropped out of them.

2. You mention that students get “distracted” by what’s in the background of the images, when they’re “supposed” to be focused on the “historical” figure. Might I remind you that I’m saying that is part of the problem-that someone decided who was important in history, and who was NOT important enough to bother including in class material. I also pointed out that regardless of INTENT, the RESULT is the same. You’ve said this, more or less, but I think that needs to be re-emphasized.

I think it also says a lot that the general opinion seems to be that the PROBLEM WITH SHOWING PEOPLE OF COLOR IN HISTORICAL IMAGES IS THAT STUDENTS WILL BE TOO INTERESTED.

^That says a lot about the state of education in the U.S. if students actually being interested is the problem.

*shakes head*

I stopped calling myself a pacifist when I heard Gandhi told women they should not physically fight off their rapists.
I believe there is such a thing as a non violent fist.

Andrea Gibson, Etiquette Leash (via live-lee)

This is the same guy who was racist towards black people and slept naked with little girls.

(via stillcanttimetravel)

Gandhi really hated black people. He called the indigenous (black) South Africans “kaffir” (which is like using the n word) and said more than once that Africans were inferior to Indians, being more like animals. 

(via drziggystardust)

Also do remember that this man advocated those who were Jewish during WW2 to essentially commit mass suicide by throwing themselves onto the Nazi regime’s weapons. Like most romanticized “peaceful” or “revolutionary” historical figures he was completely the opposite in nearly every way.

(via talizorahvascutiepie)

It’s ridiculous the way history takes people who were basically complete assholes and just sweeps all the negative stuff under the rug to try and pretend they were some amazing, perfect visionaries who we should all aspire to be like

I literally NEVER heard any mention of all the terrible shit about Ghandi when I learned about ‘history’ in school

(via thefingerfuckingfemalefury)

calvcp:

Every year, almost 1.5 million high school students nationwide experience physical abuse from a boyfriend or girlfriend.

National Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Month



By Julie Nauman, VCGCB Executive Officer 
It can be hard to relate to statistics; after all, they are just numbers without a face, right? But what happens when that next statistic is your best friend? Your teammate? Your little sister? The closer it hits to home, the easier it is to see that even one victim is too many. Every year, almost 1.5 million high school students nationwide experience physical abuse from a boyfriend or girlfriend.1
That’s one in ten high school students who has been purposefully hit, slapped or physically hurt by a partner.2
Females are disproportionately affected, with one in four high school girls a victim of physical abuse in their relationships.3
When including emotional and verbal injury, the rate of dating abuse jumps to one in three teenagers.4

The prevalence of teen dating violence is inexcusable, but the good news about bad statistics is that YOU can change them. Dating violence is not usually a one-time incident, but a pattern of destructive behaviors used to control another person. In that sense, putting an end to teen dating violence is a matter of spotting healthy versus unhealthy relationships, looking out for your peers, and building a culture of respect where abuse is unacceptable. Only 33% of teens who were in an abusive relationship ever told anyone about the abuse, 5 and 81% of parents believe teen dating violence is not an issue or admit they don’t know if it’s an issue.6 It’s time to change these attitudes in our schools and communities. As a mother, the thought of any child being hurt by, or inflicting pain on another, is infuriating. We—parents, teachers, coaches, mentors—need to speak out against teen dating violence in order to stop the abuse before it begins. We have a shared responsibility to model healthy relationships founded in respect and equality; to teach our children that love and abuse cannot exist simultaneously and that violence doesn’t equal strength. This February, make your voice heard during National Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Month. 
If you or someone you know has a question about a relationship, visit loveisrespect.org or text “loveis” to 22522. For additional resources, visit http://www.teendvmonth.org. 

calvcp:

Every year, almost 1.5 million high school students nationwide experience physical abuse from a boyfriend or girlfriend.

National Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Month

By Julie Nauman, VCGCB Executive Officer 
It can be hard to relate to statistics; after all, they are just numbers without a face, right? But what happens when that next statistic is your best friend? Your teammate? Your little sister? The closer it hits to home, the easier it is to see that even one victim is too many. 
  • Every year, almost 1.5 million high school students nationwide experience physical abuse from a boyfriend or girlfriend.1
  • That’s one in ten high school students who has been purposefully hit, slapped or physically hurt by a partner.2
  • Females are disproportionately affected, with one in four high school girls a victim of physical abuse in their relationships.3
  • When including emotional and verbal injury, the rate of dating abuse jumps to one in three teenagers.4
The prevalence of teen dating violence is inexcusable, but the good news about bad statistics is that YOU can change them. Dating violence is not usually a one-time incident, but a pattern of destructive behaviors used to control another person. In that sense, putting an end to teen dating violence is a matter of spotting healthy versus unhealthy relationships, looking out for your peers, and building a culture of respect where abuse is unacceptable. 

Only 33% of teens who were in an abusive relationship ever told anyone about the abuse, 5 and 81% of parents believe teen dating violence is not an issue or admit they don’t know if it’s an issue.6 It’s time to change these attitudes in our schools and communities. As a mother, the thought of any child being hurt by, or inflicting pain on another, is infuriating. We—parents, teachers, coaches, mentors—need to speak out against teen dating violence in order to stop the abuse before it begins. We have a shared responsibility to model healthy relationships founded in respect and equality; to teach our children that love and abuse cannot exist simultaneously and that violence doesn’t equal strength. This February, make your voice heard during National Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Month. 

If you or someone you know has a question about a relationship, visit loveisrespect.org or text “loveis” to 22522. For additional resources, visit http://www.teendvmonth.org

If your ancestors cut down all the trees, it’s not your fault, but you still don’t live in a forest.

Pam Oliver, a professor in the UW-Madison sociology department, explaining the historical roots of racism in the United States to her undergraduate students (mostly middle-class and White).  I try to use this when I teach race now, too, to get past the defensive “but why are you BLAMING ME” reaction. (via cabell)

THIS. THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS.

To all the white people who say that they shouldn’t have responsibility in racism because they’re ancestors and not them who participated in slavery, think about this!

(via iamabutchsolo)